Terence Taylor

 

Trinity Centre for Bioengineering,
Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute,
Trinity College Dublin,
152-160 Pearse Street,
Dublin 2

Email: taylorte@tcd.ie
Twitter:Terence’s Twitter page
LinkedIn:Terence’s LinkedIn page

Biographical Information

Terence received a BEng in Electronic Engineering from NUI Maynooth, Ireland in 2010. He later received an MEng in Electronic Engineering form NUI Maynooth, Ireland in 2011. He then gained biomedical industry experience working as an Acoustic Analysis Engineer at Vitalograph Ireland Ltd. This role involved employing speech recognition methods to detect and analyse respiratory acoustic features during inhaler use in order to remotely monitor medication adherence. This project was in collaboration with The Institute of Electronics, Communications and Information Technology (ECIT) at Queen’s University Belfast in Northern Ireland and was funded by InterTrade Ireland as part of a FUSION project. Terence received a Postgraduate Diploma in Business Management from University College Dublin, Ireland in 2013 as part of the InterTrade Ireland FUSION project. He received an InterTrade Ireland Exemplar Award for outstanding success in innovation whilst participating in the InterTrade Ireland FUSION programme. Terence is currently undertaking a PhD at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland under the supervision of Professor Richard Reilly in the research area of acoustic analysis in respiratory medicine. Terence has also received a Postgraduate Certificate in Statistics in 2015 from Trinity College Dublin, Ireland while studying for his PhD.

 

Receiving InterTrade Ireland FUSION Exemplar Award, 2013

Receiving InterTrade Ireland FUSION Exemplar Award, 2013

Research Interests

“Respiratory acoustic feature extraction and its use in biomedical applications”. Research focused on employing acoustic methods to remotely monitor inhaler user technique in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients.

 

Publications in International Reviewed Journals

[1] Taylor T E, Holmes M S, Sulaiman I, Costello R W and Reilly, R B 2016 Monitoring inhaler inhalations using an acoustic sensor proximal to inhaler devices Journal of aerosol medicine and pulmonary drug delivery (In press)

[2] Sulaiman I, Mac Hale E, Holmes M, Hughes C, D’Arcy S, Taylor T, Rapcan V, Doyle F, Breathnach A and Seheult J 2016 A protocol for a randomised clinical trial of the effect of providing feedback on inhaler technique and adherence from an electronic device in patients with poorly controlled severe asthma BMJ open 6 e009350
Paper is available here

[3] D’Arcy S, MacHale E, Seheult J, Holmes M S, Hughes C, Sulaiman I, Hyland D, O’Reilly C, Glynn S, Al-Zaabi T, McCourt J, Taylor T, Keane F, Killane I, Reilly R B and Costello R W 2014 A Method to Assess Adherence in Inhaler Use through Analysis of Acoustic Recordings of Inhaler Events PloS one 9 e98701
Paper is available here

Proceedings Papers for International Conferences

[1] Taylor T E, Holmes M S, Sulaiman I, Costello R W and Reilly R B 2015 Influences of gender and anthropometric features on inspiratory inhaler acoustics and peak inspiratory flow rate. In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2015 37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE, pp 2227-30
Paper is available here

[2] Taylor T E, Holmes M S, Sulaiman I, D’Arcy S, Costello R W and Reilly R B 2014 An acoustic method to automatically detect pressurized metered dose inhaler actuations. In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE, pp 4611-4
Paper is available here

Podium Presentations at International Conferences

[1] Taylor T E, Holmes M S, Sulaiman I, Costello R W and Reilly R B. Influence of gender and anthropometric features on inspiratory inhaler acoustics and peak inspiratory flow rate. 37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE EMBS, Milan, Italy. August 2015

[2] Taylor T E, Holmes M S, Sulaiman I, Costello R W and Reilly R B. Acoustic Features of Inhaler Sounds are repeatable across a Range of Peak Inspiratory Flow Rates: An Opportunity to monitor Respiratory Health longitudinally. 20th International Congress on Aerosols in Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, Munich, Germany. June 2015

[3] Taylor T E, Holmes M S, Sulaiman I, Costello R W and Reilly R B. Objective measurement of peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR) in the Diskus, Turbuhaler and Evohaler using non-contact acoustic methods. 20th International Congress on Aerosols in Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, Munich, Germany. June 2015

Podium presentation at 20th International Congress on Aerosols in Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, Munich 2015

Podium presentation at 20th International Congress on Aerosols in Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, Munich 2015

 

Poster Presentations at International Conferences

[1] Taylor T E, Holmes M S, Sulaiman I, D’Arcy S, Costello R W and Reilly R B 2014 An acoustic method to automatically detect pressurized metered dose inhaler actuations. In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE: IEEE) pp 4611-4
Poster is available here

[2] Taylor T E, Holmes M S, Sulaiman I, Costello R W and Reilly R B. Acoustic Features of Inhaler Sounds are repeatable across a Range of Peak Inspiratory Flow Rates: An Opportunity to monitor Respiratory Health longitudinally. 20th International Congress on Aerosols in Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, Munich, Germany. June 2015

[3] Holmes M S, Taylor T E, Sulaiman I, Costello R W and Reilly R B. Objective measurement of peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR) in the Diskus, Turbuhaler and Evohaler using non-contact acoustic methods. 20th International Congress on Aerosols in Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, Munich, Germany. June 2015

Poster presentation at 20th International Congress on Aerosols in Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, Munich 2015

Poster presentation at 20th International Congress on Aerosols in Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, Munich 2015